Community Engagement Blog

Librarians make our communities better places to live, work, study, and play.  This blog highlights outstanding library community partnerships and shares best practices.

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Medical Librarians Support Clinical Research and Improve the Patient Experience

The Massachusetts Library System received an inquiry in our continuing education survey about what hospital and medical librarians do. In response, I’m pleased to bring you an interview with Sarah Carnes, the Clinical Librarian at the Bedford VA Medical Center. In this interview, she will share the numerous ways she supports clinical research and contributes to improving the patient experience.

Sarah Carnes

Sarah Carnes, Clinical Librarian

What services do you provide to support the wide-ranging needs of Bedford VA Medical Center’s staff?

As the Clinical Librarian at the Bedford VA Medical Center, I provide support to staff working in a wide variety of disciplines. Clinical and research staff must be current on information in order to conduct evidence-based care and impactful research. The majority of our resources are available online in our Knowledge Library, our user-friendly online medical library platform. Staff also have access to these materials when offsite as many will conduct their in-depth reading outside of normal working hours.

Research shows that for all the convenience of electronic health records, telemedicine, and online medical libraries, there is not enough time in the day for providers to keep up with all the information they wish to access. Clinical librarians possess the expertise to mitigate the barriers between staff and the information they need. Staff request information or assistance via email, phone or in-person. Some of the requests are fulfilled relatively quickly, such as a request for the full-text of an article or information on how to set up a literature alert or offsite account. Others take a great deal more time, such as complex literature searches for differential diagnoses or for systematic reviews–which might take anywhere between three to nine hours. Over the course of the last year and a half, I have completed over 600 searches and reference questions and I estimate that saved staff approximately 450 hours.

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Reflections on RIPL: Jessi Finnie

RIPL

In May 2018, the Massachusetts Library System hosted the Research Institute for Public Libraries.  Fifty librarians attended the institute with the goal of building research into their activities.  Interested to learn more about how the institute has benefitted our members this past year, I reached out to Jessi Finnie, the Director of the Scituate Town Library.  In this interview, Jessi will tell you about how she integrated what she learned at RIPL into her workflow and strategic planning process.

Jessi Finnie

Jessi Finnie opening the doors at the Scituate Town Library grand opening.

Reflecting on the Research Institute for Public Libraries (RIPL), what did you think about your experience?

Jessi Finnie:  Overall, I was pleased with my experience at RIPL and left with more tools in my tool belt to manage our library’s Strategic Planning process.

What are the most useful tools and resources you learned about at the RIPL? 

While I already knew how to pull census data, RIPL highlighted tools within FactFinder such as using the advanced search feature to compare data between towns. We also learned of a number of smaller and more niche databases that could provide helpful data such as “Kid’s Count” and some of the information to be found from the Centers for Disease Control.

Learning about new resources is always helpful, but one of my biggest takeaways from the session was simplifying and maximizing my presentation data. We discussed the pros and cons of various types of charts and graphs, and learned a bit about how people respond to these visual tools. I think data analysis comes naturally to many librarians, but presenting data in an impactful way can be a bit more challenging. Continue reading

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Citizenship Day at the Boston Public Library

With the red-blue divide over immigration policy and our government shut-down, it’s a very stressful time to be an immigrant.  There’s a trusted, welcoming place of equal opportunity in every community:  the public library.  In this interview, Melissa Theroux, Literacy Coordinator, at the Boston Public Library (BPL) will tell you about the BPL’s experience hosting a Naturalization Ceremony and establishing Immigrant Information Corners in partnership with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Please tell us about the Naturalization Ceremony that the Boston Public Library hosted for Citizenship Day.

Boston Public Library Naturalization Ceremony
Photo Credit: Boston Public Library

Melissa Theroux: On September 17th, 2018, we held a Naturalization Ceremony at the Central Library in Copley Square. It was an honor to be part of this inspiring event! The idea for having the ceremony on Citizenship Day came from USCIS staff at the Boston office, specifically District Director Denis Riordan.  The ceremony was held in Central Library’s Rabb Lecture Hall. We had a total of ninety new citizens naturalized that morning, along with their family and friends. Boston Public Library President David Leonard, a naturalized citizen himself, gave the opening remarks, with Judge Marianne Bowler presiding. We were fortunate to have the Back Bay Chorale (a neighborhood chorus that provides outreach to community programs) present to sing during the ceremony. Afterward, the new citizens and their families were invited to a reception, where community partners were on hand to assist them with signing up for passports and registering to vote. The USCIS staff were instrumental in introducing us to partners who provide these services. Continue reading

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Revive Civility Program Series at the Wilmington Memorial Library

Are you concerned about the dramatic decline in civil discourse?  With this in mind, the Wilmington Memorial Library set-out to generate a community-wide atmosphere of kindness through a Revive Civility program series.  The Board of Selectmen were so pleased with this series that they issued a proclamation declaring September 2018 as the Revive Civility Month.  This series is an excellent example of a public library civic engagement program fostering the common good.

Keynote Address by Dr. Carolyn Lukensmeyer

Keynote Address by Dr. Carolyn Lukensmeyer

Please tell us about your Revive Civility program series.

In September 2018, the Wilmington Memorial Library presented Revive Civility a month long initiative to raise awareness of the importance of engaging in civil conversations. The library launched Revive Civility with a presentation by Dr. Carolyn Lukensmeyer, the Executive Director of the National Institute for Civil Discourse.  Over 85 people attended this event, including representatives from state and local government. They heard Dr. Lukensmeyer  speak about the causes of incivility in the political arena and beyond and took away tips on what they can do about it. Her presentation set the tone for the three discussion sessions that followed later in the month on Gun Control, NFL Protests, and the Future of Wilmington. The intent of these discussion programs was to give attendees the opportunity to practice the tenets of civility while potentially speaking to those who may disagree with them.   In addition, the library hosted Bill Littlefield from Public Radio’s Only a Game who spoke on sportsmanship.

Post It Note Positivity Wall

Meditation sessions were offered throughout the month to allow people to learn techniques for dealing with emotions that prompt uncivil behavior.  In addition to offering programs related to civility, the library had books on display that dealt with civility and kindness. We purchased 15 copies each of the two featured books Choosing Civility by P. M. Forni and Treating People Well by Lea Berman and Jeremy Bernard. These books were selected for the library’s monthly book discussions.  We also offered a number of children and teen programs that dealt with kindness and etiquette as well as some passive programs such as the “Kindness Tree” and “Post It Positivity Wall” to encourage patrons to think positive and kind thoughts. Continue reading

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Academic Libraries and Mental Health

Following my ignite presentation at the North Atlantic Health Sciences Libraries Conference about co-creating library/social services partnerships with our public library members, I received a question about how academic health sciences librarians can support medical students’ mental health because of the increased risk of mental illness due to factors like limited sleep, intense competition, and academic demands during medical school.

Following my presentation, I thought about some other responses that I could have shared.  So, here are some tips for ways that academic librarians can support students’ mental health:

      • Incorporate opportunities for mindfulness into the academic library experience such as space for meditation and yoga, stress reduction workshops, mindfulness kits, exercise bikes, and plants. Check out the mindfulness activities at the Merrimack College Library
      • Host an all-campus read of a mental health book such as An Unquiet Mind by Kay Redfield Jamison followed with a presentation by a panel of health professionals who have experienced mental illness themselves or cared for a loved one.
      • Host an all-campus read of a fun book like the Little Book of Hygge:  Danish Secrets to Happy Living.  Combine it with a Season on Hygge similar to the Groton Public Library’s recent program series.  Create a social area in the library for board games and puzzles.  Create cozy reading nooks.  Make a fire place out of weeded books and orange lights. Provide coffee, tea, and hot chocolate.
      • Use crafts as a social opportunity for stress relief.  Such as this fun Study Buddies! activity at the Tufts Hirsch Library.
      • Get trained in Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) and/or host workshops on campus.  MHFA workshops are often grant funded.  Find a local MHFA workshop or trainer near you.

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